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General Info
America Samoa is a collection of seven islands administered by the USA since 1899 and is situated about 100km to the south east of Independent Samoa with which it shares its history and culture.

There is little tourist infrastructure on America Samoa and the hotels in Pago Pago and along the south coast of Tutuila cater mostly to businessmen and the occasional discerning travellers in search of the islands pristine and hidden environment. It's as if the islands were hiding from the world. Even it's reputation is unjustly soured. Unfortunately there are facets of the island that are rather crude - it's fast food joints, large cars and cable television are typically American and the large tuna canning factories of Pago Pago have in the past created pollution and prostitution amongst its Asian workers. But these issues are easily outweighed by the stunning coastal scenery and mountain peaks between which remain virgin tropical forests and rich and important archeological sites.

Tutuila is by far the largest and most populated island of the group. Its coast is rugged, with only a few secluded beaches, and its mountains are steep and covered in lush tropical rain forest. The north coast of Tutuila is virtually inaccessible other than by boat.


Pago Pago is the capital set against steep mountains of the National Park and a deep and extremely attractive harbour. Pago Pago is a 30-minute flight from the capital town of Apia in Western Samoa.


The best beaches in American Samoa and some fine archaeological sites are found on the three outer islands of the Manu'a Group about 60 miles from Tutuila. These islands are serviced by two daily flights and there are a few small basic guesthouse as accommodation. Ofu beach is a stunning 2-mile stretch of white sand backed by endless coconut palms and mountains.